Fire

A couple of weeks ago I learned that if I take two summer classes this upcoming May, I'd be able to graduate one semester early. 


Time and time again, my dad has asked me whether or not I truly want to major in journalism. He constantly reminds me, "But Sheri, I don't see you read a newspaper everyday. I don't see you reading books. Do you even write outside of schoolwork?" It makes me feel like I am wasting my time in college. Like I am enrolled in classes just to fulfill requirements because I need them to have my name stamped on a diploma. For the longest time I thought I wanted to be a journalist because in high school, my teachers told me I should have my essays published, or that I should write for the school newspaper. And because I wasn't good at math or science or art or history, I naturally fell into writing because I liked it. It made me feel good because I wrote for me, and for no one else. The fact that other people appreciated my writing, even if it wasn't for them, was enough for me.


But over ginger chicken and rice last night, the topic arose once again. Nicolas asked me if I'm passionate about journalism.

I mean, if you're passionate about something, you'd be able to name more than a few individuals that work in that particular field. You'd be able to discuss what your passion means to you and why you want to pursue it.

I couldn't say anything that would prove my desire for being a journalist. I tried. I explained that NYU provides a very broad curriculum teaching students the history of journalism and instructing them how to report. Journalism majors are required to have a second major, so at least we could specialize in a certain field and be knowledgable when interviewing prospective candidates in the area we've chosen. For example, Tania's majoring in journalism and cinema studies. So when she interviews Scorsese one day, she will have enough background knowlege to ask him thoughtful and meaningful questions, not stupid ones that are asked in every interview. I know I am capable of being a journalist, but I am not sure if I am capable of loving it.

My family expects great things from me. I'm not just talking about just my immediate family, but my aunts and dear grandma as well. They think I am going to be the next Kaity Tong, gracing PIX everynight at 10pm. Even though there isn't a constant pressure of having to be successful in the future, it's implied in the way my grandma points at the TV screen, then holds my arm with a smile so big, her eyes become crescents.

The more I thought about it, the sadder I felt because it suddenly dawned on me that I'm studying something I am not 100% interested in. And with graduation coming in 1.5 years (or less), I feel like I have to act fast. I feel like I need to know what I'm doing for the rest of my life, because I know others that have recently graduated and are lost because they think they are doing something they like, but they don't really go after it. So many people settle for a job they don't particularly enjoy, just because it pays rent at the end of the day. I don't want to waste my time. I want to do something more than just satisfying, I want to do something fulfilling. 

I am interested in photography, fashion, networking, organizing, and bringing people together.

We'll see what happens.

30.

Comments

  1. Good Article! It's fuuny because I have a fan site of a Journalist/News Anchor! www.lynnaluvers.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is super hard figuring it out. I used up 4 years working on cars because I thought it was what I wanted to do but turns out doing something you love to do as a job sometimes just turns to hatred. You will find your way, your a smart cookie!

    ReplyDelete
  3. you are a smart cookie so you will find, indeed !

    ReplyDelete
  4. you will definitely find something Sheri :) Blah, I think about this constantly too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Journalism part of all five things you're interested in photography, fashion, networking, organizing, and bringing people together... so I'd say you're on the right track.

    Really, people with the most success and passion has more often than not followed a linear education. It's the tangents that they take off the path that fuels their passion.

    gl

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts